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Toggle GPIO on Raspberry Pi using HomeKit

In this post, I take my HomeKit Raspberry Pi integration a step further, by turning on/off a LED using the homebridge-gpio-wpi plugin. With the ability to control the GPIO pins, I should be able to turn on/off much bigger things using solid state relays and such.

Install homebridge-gpio-wpi plugin

The installation should be pretty straightforward. Assuming you are at the command line in the home folder, run

npm install homebridge-gpio-wpi

That should install all node modules under ~/node_modules/.

Configure homebridge by editing ~/.homebridge/config.json.

Here’s mine

{
    "bridge": {
        "name": "Homebridge",
        "username": "CC:22:3D:E3:CE:32",
        "port": 51826,
        "pin": "031-45-155"
    },

    "description": "This has some fake accessories",

    "accessories": [
        {
            "accessory":      "FakeBulb",
            "name":           "Test lamp",
            "bulb_name":      "Lamp 1"
        },
        {
            "accessory": "GPIO",
            "name": "GPIO2",
            "pin": 27
        }
    ],

    "platforms": []
}

Configure GPIO2 using the gpio utility, and start homebridge

gpio -g mode 27 out
gpio -g mode 27 down
gpio export 27 out
export NODE_PATH=$HOME/node_modules/
homebridge

See also how to run homebridge as a service upon reboot.

Test with HomeKit

If you’ve configured the Homebridge peripheral in an iOS app such as Hesperus, it should now show you a new device called GPIO2, and allow you to switch it on/off.

LED

Hesperus allows you to create a schedule to turn on and off devices.

Schedule